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Irish Georgian Society Presents: James P. MacGuire

The Irish Georgian Society and the Charleston Library Society presents James P. MacGuire, Author of Real Lace Revisited: Inside the Hidden World of America’s Irish Aristocracy. To RSVP to this event, call 843-723-9912 or email dreutter@charlestonlibrarysociety.org

The Irish Georgian Society is proud to present an evening with James P. MacGuire, author of Real Lace Revisited: Inside the Hidden World of America’s Irish Aristocracy. Using his gift of rich storytelling, Mr. MacGuire offers a compelling update to Stephen Birmingham’s masterwork Real Lace. Mr. MacGuire creates his own entertaining portrait of life among the upper-class Irish world as it grew and changed, further detailing and filling out this engrossing portion of America's social history.

James P. MacGuire was born in New York and educated at John Hopkins and Cambridge. He has worked for Time, Inc., Macmillan, The Health Network and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. His poetry, fiction and journalism have been published in many national publications. He is the author or coauthor of ten books and has two beloved sons, Pierce and Rhoads.

Sir David Davies, the President of the Society, Michael Wall, the Chair of the Irish Board of Directors, Donough Cahill, the Director of the Society in Ireland and the well known author and expert on Irish Georgian architecture Robert O’Byrne, will be on hand for the event.

About The Irish Georgian Society

The Irish Georgian Society promotes awareness and protection of Ireland’s architectural heritage and decorative arts. It achieves this through conservation projects that have saved many important historic buildings; through education programs that encompass seminars, publications and specialist tours; and through campaigning for the protection of endangered buildings.

  Jackie Kennedy on a visit to Castletown House in Cellbridge, Co. Kildare in 1967 with Desmond Guinness, the founder of the Society.

Jackie Kennedy on a visit to Castletown House in Cellbridge, Co. Kildare in 1967 with Desmond Guinness, the founder of the Society.